Royal Australian Navy Commissions HMAS Brisbane (III) (DDG 41)

IndraStra Global

Royal Australian Navy Commissions HMAS Brisbane (III) (DDG 41)

By IndraStra Global News Team

On October 27, 2018, The Royal Australia Navy (RAN) has commissioned its second Hobart-class guided missile destroyer HMAS Brisbane (III) (DDG 41) at Garden Island Naval Base in Sydney.  It has been designed to help protect Australian and multinational task groups operating in an increasingly complex region and beyond.

Image Attribute: NUSHIP Brisbane at sea during builders trials viewed from her sister ship, HMAS Hobart / Source: Royal Australia Navy (RAN)

Image Attribute: NUSHIP Brisbane at sea during builders trials viewed from her sister ship, HMAS Hobart / Source: Royal Australia Navy (RAN)

HMAS Brisbane was delivered to the RAN in July under the US$ 9.1 billion Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Alliance (also known as, SEA 4000) which comprises the Department of Defence, Raytheon Australia, and ASC Shipbuilding supported by Navantia as the platform system designer. The United States Navy and Lockheed Martin are providing the ships’ Aegis Combat System.

The AWD Alliance is delivering three advanced multirole vessels - HMAS Hobart (Commissioned on September 23, 2017), HMAS Brisbane (Commissioned on October 27, 2018) and HMAS Sydney (Launched in May 2018, to be commissioned in next year) will replace the Frigate, Guided Missile ships (FFGs) of the RAN.

Image Attribute: HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) Cloth Patch

Image Attribute: HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) Cloth Patch

This class of the ship is fitted with AN/SPY-1, advanced phased-array radar systems - currently, a key component of the Aegis Combat System which consists of 48-cell MK 41 Vertical Launching System, capable of firing Raytheon’s Standard Missiles (SM) of all variants as well as the RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile.


Image Attribute: AN/SPY-1, a US naval 3D radar system manufactured by Lockheed Martin.

Each destroyer of this class has an overall length of 147.2 meters (483 ft), a maximum beam of 18.6 meters (61 ft), and a draught of 5.17 meters (17.0 ft). At the final launch, the ships will have a full-load displacement of 6,250 tonnes (6,150 long tons; 6,890 short tons). The Hobarts have been designed to allow for upgrades and installation of new equipment, with a theoretical maximum displacement of 7,000 tonnes (6,900 long tons; 7,700 short tons).

The ship is powered by combined diesel or gas turbine (CODOG) propulsion system which consists of two General Electric Marine model 7LM2500-SA-MLG38 gas turbines, each generating 17,500 kilowatts (23,500 hp), and two Caterpillar Bravo 16 V Bravo diesel engines, each providing 5,650 kilowatts (7,580 hp). These drive two propeller shafts, fitted with Wärtsilä controllable pitch propellers.

Image Attribute: Cutout image of General Electric Marine model 7LM2500-SA-MLG38 gas turbine / Source: GE Aviation

Image Attribute: Cutout image of General Electric Marine model 7LM2500-SA-MLG38 gas turbine / Source: GE Aviation

The ships' maximum speed is over 28 knots (52 km/h; 32 mph), with a range of over 5,000 nautical miles (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph); although not fast enough to keep pace with an American carrier battle group, the RAN is happy with the speed/range tradeoff, as endurance is more important for Australian operating conditions.


With reporting by Naval-Technology.com, and Royal Australian Navy's Press Release