S&T | India's GSLV Mk III Successfully launches GSAT-19 Satellite

S&T | India's GSLV Mk III Successfully launches GSAT-19 Satellite

Image Attribute: Launch of India's heavy lift launch vehicle GSLV Mk-III on June 5, 2017 / Source: Indian Space Research Organization

Image Attribute: Launch of India's heavy lift launch vehicle GSLV Mk-III on June 5, 2017 / Source: Indian Space Research Organization

The first developmental flight (GSLV MkIII-D1) of India's heavy lift launch vehicle GSLV Mk-III was successfully conducted on June 05, 2017 at 17:28 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota with the launch of GSAT-19 satellite. The GSLV-Mk III is the heaviest rocket ever made by India and is capable of carrying the heaviest satellites made till date.

This was the first orbital mission of GSLV MkIII which was mainly intended to evaluate the vehicle performance including that of its fully indigenous cryogenic upper stage during the flight. Weighing 3136 kg at lift-off, GSAT-19 is the heaviest satellite launched from the Indian soil. 

The GSAT-19, as per the Indian Space Research Organisation is a multi-beam satellite that carries Ka and Ku band forward and return link transponders and geostationary radiation spectrometer (GRASP) to monitor and study the nature of charged particles and the influence of space radiation on satellites and their electronic components. The satellite will act as a testbed for the modular I-6K satellite bus, carrying experimental technologies such as ion thrusters for maneuvering and stabilization, active thermal control using thermal radiators, a miniaturized inertial reference unit, indigenously produced lithium-ion batteries, and C-band traveling-wave-tube amplifiers.

The satellite, which has a life span of 10 years, also features certain advanced spacecraft technologies including miniaturised heat pipe, a fibre optic gyro, micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer, Ku-band TTC transponder, as well an indigenous lithium-ion battery.

After a twenty-five and a half hour smooth countdown, the mission began with the launch of the 640-ton GSLV Mk-III at 5:28 pm IST from the Second Launch Pad as scheduled with the ignition of its two S200 solid strap-on boosters. Following this, the major phases of the flight occurred as scheduled. The upper stage of GSLV MkIII vehicle is a new cryogenic stage (C25) indigenously configured, designed and realized by ISRO. The cryogenic stage used liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen as propellants with a total loading of 28 tons. The stage is powered by a 20-ton thrust cryogenic engine (CE20) operating on ‘gas generator cycle’. The performance of the engine and stage during the mission was as predicted. About sixteen minutes after lift-off, GSAT-19 satellite was successfully placed in orbit. 

Soon after its separation from GSLV, the Master Control Facility (MCF) at Hassan in Karnataka assumed control of the satellite. GSAT-19 is a high throughput communication satellite. 

In the coming days, the GSAT-19 orbit will be raised from its present Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) to the final circular Geostationary Orbit (GSO) by firing the satellite's Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) in stages. During the final phase of this operation, the solar panels and antenna reflectors of the satellite will be deployed. The satellite will be commissioned into service after its positioning in the designated slot in the GSO following in-orbit testing of its payloads.

Reporting by Press Information Bureau 
    Blogger Comment
    Facebook Comment